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Multiple myeloma drugs fall into various drug classes, including proteasome inhibitors (PIs), immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs®), alkylating agents, corticosteriods, histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACs), bisphosphonates, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs).

Drugs in Current Use for Multiple Myeloma

In this section, a chart breaks down these medications according to their drug class. 

Proteasome inhibitors (PI)

  • NINLARO®  |  ixazomib  |  I
    Ninlaro (ixazomib) is an oral prescription medicine used to treat multiple myeloma in combination with the medicines Revlimid® (lenalidomide) and dexamethasone, in people who have received at least one prior treatment.
  • KYPROLIS®  |  carfilzomib  |  cfz, car, K
    Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for injection is a prescription medication used to treat patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received one to three previous treatments for multiple myeloma.
  • VELCADE®  |  bortezomib  |  btz, bor, V
    Velcade (bortezomib) is an anti-cancer agent available for injection into a vein (intravenously or IV) or under the skin (subcutaneously). Velcade is indicated for the treatment of newly diagnosed and relapsed or refractory myeloma.

Immunomodulators (IMiD)

  • POMALYST®  |  pomalidomide  |  pom, P
    Pomalyst (pomalidomide) is an oral treatment for multiple myeloma indicated, in combination with dexamethasone, for patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least two prior therapies including lenalidomide and a proteasome inhibitor
  • REVLIMID®  |  lenalidomide  |  len, R
    Revlimid (lenalidomide), an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD®), is the first oral medication that was developed for treatment of multiple myeloma. It is used in the newly diagnosed, maintenance therapy, and relapsed and/or refractory settings.
  • THALOMID®  |  thalidomide  |  thal, T
    Thalomid (thalidomide) is an oral immunomodulatory drug, an agent that can modify or regulate the immune system. It has both anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. Thalidomide was first used to treat multiple myeloma in 1997.

Monoclonal antibodies (MAb)

  • DARZALEX®  |  daratumumab  |  dara
    Darzalex (daratumumab) is a laboratory-made monoclonal antibody that targets a specific single protein on the surface of myeloma cells.  
  • EMPLICITI®  |  elotuzumab  |  elo, E
    Empliciti (elotuzumab) is a monoclonal antibody. It is used as an intravenously infused prescription medicine used to treat multiple myeloma in combination with the medicines Revlimid® (lenalidomide) and dexamethasone, in people who have received one to three prior treatments for their disease.
  • SARCLISA®  |  isatuximab-ifrc
    Sarclisa (isatuximab-ifrc) is a novel anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody. Although antibodies are a naturally-occurring part of the immune system, Sarclisa and other antibodies used to treat diseases are made in a laboratory. 

XP01 inhibitor

  • XPOVIO®  |  selinexor
    Xpovio (selinexor), a new medication to treat myeloma, is a “nuclear export inhibitor,” the first compound in this new drug class. Nuclear export inhibitors prevent cancer cells from expelling special genes in the cell nucleus called tumor suppressor proteins that help protect the cell from cancer.

Alkylating agents

  • ALKERAN®, ALPHALAN®  |  mel, M
    Alkeran (melphalan) is a chemotherapy drug commonly used in treating multiple myeloma. It belongs to the class of drugs known as alkylating agents, which inhibit DNA and RNA synthesis, causing the death of both dividing and non-dividing tumor cells. 
  • CYTOXAN®  |  cyclophosphomide  |  CTX, Cy, C
    Cytoxan (cyclophosphomide) was first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1959, and is still widely used to treat multiple myeloma, as well as many other types of cancer and autoimmune diseases. 
  • TREANDA®  |  bendamustine
    Treanda (bendamustine) belongs to a class of cancer chemotherapy drugs known as alkylating agents. It works by killing cancer cells or slowing their growth.

Histone Deactylase Inhibitors  (HDAC)  

  • FARYDAK®  |  panobinostat  
    Farydak (panobinostat)  is a prescription medication taken in combination with Velcade and dexamethasone to treat patients with multiple myeloma who have already been treated with Velcade and an immunomodulatory drug.

Corticosteroids

  • DECADRON®  |  dexamethasone  |  D, d, dex, DXM
    Dexamethasone (which is sometimes called “dex” for short) is also known by the brand names Decadron®, Dexasone®, Diodex®, Hexadrol®, and Maxidex®. It is one of the most frequently used medications in the treatment of multiple myeloma.
  • DELTASONE®  |  prednisone  |  pred, P
    Prednisone belongs to a class of drugs known as corticosteroids. It decreases your immune system's response to various diseases to reduce symptoms such as swelling and allergic-type reactions.
  • MEDROL®  |  methylprednisolone
    Methylprednisolone is used to decrease your immune system's response to various diseases to reduce symptoms such as swelling, pain, and allergic-type reactions. 

Bone-modifying agents

  • XGEVA®  |  denosumab
    Denosumab (trade names Prolia and Xgeva) is a human monoclonal antibody for the treatment of osteoporosis, treatment-induced bone loss, metastases to bone, and giant cell tumor of bone.
  • ZOMETA®  |  zoledronic acid  |  zol
    Zoledronic acid is also used with cancer chemotherapy to treat bone problems that may occur with multiple myeloma and other types of cancer (such as breast, lung) that have spread to the bones.
  • AREDIA®  |  pamidronate  |  pmd
    Pamidronate is used to treat high blood calcium levels and certain bone problems (bone metastases/lesions) that may occur with some types of cancer.

Download Chart of Approved Multiple Myeloma Drugs

 

Guide to Drug Names

Multiple myeloma treatments have evolved over the last thirty years. Since 2009 alone, more than a dozen new treatments have been developed for the disease. This table provides a comprehensive list of many of the drugs that have been used to treat myeloma through time. You may want to reference this list if you are a patient researching clinical trials or if you are a myeloma researcher.

GENERIC NAME BRAND NAME ORIGINAL NAME

afuresertib

 

GSK2110183

bendamustine

Treanda®

SDX-105

bortezomib

Velcade®

PS-341

carfilzomib

Kyprolis®

PR-171

cyclophosphamide

Cytoxan®

 

dabrafenib

Tafinlar®

 

daratumumab

Darzalex®

CD38 mAb

dasatinib

Sprycel®

BMS-354825

denosumab

XGEVA®

AMG-162, osteoprotegerin

dinaciclib

 

SCH 727965

durvalumab

 

MED14736

eltrombopag

Promacta®

 

elotuzumab

Empliciti®

HuLuc63

everolimus

Afinitor®

LY317615

filanesib

 

ARRY-520

Ibrutinib

Imbruvica®

PCI-32765

indatuximab ravtansine

 

BT062

ipilumumab

Yervoy®

 

ixazomib

Ninlaro®

MLN9708

lenalidomide

Revlimid®

CC-5013

lirilumab

 

IPH-2102, BMS-986015

marizomib

 

NPI-0052, salinosporamide

masitinib

 

AB1010

melphalan

Alkeran®

 

nelfinavir

Viracept®

 

nivolumab

Opdivo®

BMS-936558

oprozomib

 

ONX-0912

palbociclib

Ibrance®

PD 0332991

pamidronate

Aredia®

 

panobinostat

Farydak®

LBH589

pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

Doxil®

 

pembrolizumab

Keytruda®

MK-3475-013

pidilizumab

 

CT-011

plerixafor

Mozobil®

AMD3100

plitidepsin

Aplidin®

 

pomalidomide

Pomalyst®

CC-4047

quisinostat

 

JNJ26481585

ricolinostat

 

ACY-1215

romidepsin

Istodax®

FK228, depsipeptide

selinexor

Xpovio®

KPT-330

sirolimus

Rapamune®

rapamycin, AY 22989

sonidegib

Odomzo®

LDE225, erismodegib

sotatercept

 

ACE-011

temsirolimus

Torisel®

CCI-779

thalidomide

Thalomid®

 

trametinib

Mekinist®

GSK11202

ulocuplumab

 

BMS-936564

urelumab

 

BMS-663513

venetoclax

Venclexta®

ABT-199

vorinostat

Zolinza®

SAHA

zoledronic acid, zoledronate

Zometa®

 

 

What's Next?

What Is a Clinical Trial?

If resistant to, or intolerant of approved therapies, you may consider clinical trials. 

Learn about renal dysfunction, anemia, bone pain, infections, and other symptoms.



The International Myeloma Foundation medical and editorial content team

Comprised of leading medical researchers, hematologists, oncologists, oncology-certified nurses, medical editors, and medical journalists, our team has extensive knowledge of the multiple myeloma treatment and care landscape. Additionally, Dr. Brian G.M. Durie reviews and approves all medical content on this website.

Last Medical Review: July 15, 2020

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