Reading about the newly re-discovered Rainbow Toad in Borneo reminded me of my January 27, 2011 post referencing Mae-Wan Ho's The Rainbow and The Worm: The Physics of Organisms, where she states that "Life is all the colors of a rainbow in a worm." 

As I mentioned in that blog post, researchers in Singapore recently concluded that quantum entanglement plays a crucial role in explaining the stability and data storage of the DNA double helix.

I wrote:

 Professor [Luc] Montagnier is convinced that crucial differences can be detected at the electromagnetic level in addition to methods using conventional sequencing and "chemical" testing which are central to the overall project. 

And:

"...it seems that understanding life at the sub-molecular and electromagnetic level is now possible."

What if the spectrum of colors in the rainbow reflect the range of energies which control life processes? Imagine, for example, if all the energies that regulate the body functions could be thought of similarly to different wavelengths of light. If so, we would be able to modulate the body at the level of physics and cure cancer.

As it turns out, electromagnetic research is ongoing. Results so far have shown that researchers are getting data on electric pulses from myeloma DNA versus normal DNA, and there is an article in the current issue of Science Journal on the electric pulses from E. Coli bacteria. While it is still too early in the process to have any clear evidence, it will be interesting to see where the study leads.
 

Dr. Durie sincerely appreciates and reads all comments left here. However, he cannot answer specific medical questions and encourages readers to contact the trained IMF InfoLine staff instead. Specific medical questions posted here will be forwarded to the IMF InfoLine. Questions sent to the InfoLine are answered with input from Dr. Durie and/or other scientific advisors and IMWG members as appropriate, but will not be posted here. To contact the IMF InfoLine, call 800-452-CURE, toll-free in the US and Canada, or send an email to infoline@myeloma.org. InfoLine hours are 9 am to 4 pm PT. Thank you.

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